Wednesday, 4 June 2014

Kukkiwon shares grappling techniques on facebook

Lately I have observed that Kukkiwon has shared a lot of grappling techniques on their Facebook page. This blog has for a long time stressed the combative applications of Traditional Kukki Taekwondo and I have referenced Kukkiwon Textbook in my earlier writings, but it is one thing to read a short mentioning that
Bilde: <Nulleokkeokgi(눌러꺾기) Pressing and Snapping>

A snapping technique by pressing the assailant’s joints. This is a snapping skill to grab the opponent by the arm and press his or her elbow or shoulder joint with an arc hand or to grab the opponent by the leg and press his or her knee joint.

<Use>
      □ Mureup-nulleo-kkeokgi / 무릎 눌러꺾기 / Knee Pressing and Snapping

      □ Palgup-nulleo-kkeokgi / 팔굽 눌러꺾기 / Elbow Pressing and Snapping 

<눌러꺾기 Nulleokkeokgi>

상대방의 관절을 눌러 꺾는 기술입니다. 상대방의 팔을 잡았을 때 팔굽이나 어깨 관절 부위를 바탕손 또는 아금손으로 누르거나 다리를 잡았을 때 무릎 관절을 눌러 꺾는 기술입니다. 

    <활용>
    □ 무릎 눌러꺾기
    □ 팔굽 눌러꺾기
Pressing and Snapping
Taekwondo has pressure against joints in them and the Kukkiwon going out on their facebook page and write about techniques many people believe are not part of Taekwondo. This makes me EXTREMELY happy and if this continues I believe that the old stupid myths about Taekwondo lacking vital components in their arsenal as a combative martial art (not sport) will dissapear over time. We do have a long way to go though as evidenced by one man who imidiatly commented: 


"So now we're officially mixing Tae Kwon Do and Hapkido?"


I really really hate comments like that. They are born in ignorance and highlight the fact that the training you received was limited. Taekwondo was a martial art and as such it contained techniques for use for all combative ranges. No the techniques were not as sophisticated as dedicated grappling arts but they were there. There is a huge difference to learn how to throw someone after hitting them with an elbow in the face and the man you are throwing has no MA training vs learning how to throw as a Judo stylist. If you want to learn how to throw as a Judo student, lock limbs as a Hapkido student and fight on the ground as a Brazilian Juijutsu stylist please learn Judo, Hapkido and Brazilian Juijutsu! If you want crude, simple yet effective ways to handle youself on all ranges learn a traditional complete martial art. They will not prepare you for a Judo match but they might save your life one day.

So what did the Kukkiwon share? I have copied and pasted from the Kukkiwon Facebook page so you can see below. All pictures and text are from the Kukkiwon Facebook page so I will not provide any more sources than that:-)

"<Georeo-neomgigi (걸어넘기기) Tripping-up Technique or Sweeping Technique>

A technique by tripping up or sweeping the opponent’s leg. This is a tripping-up skill to pull the opponent by the arm or the collar, or to push the opponent’s chest or shoulder with a hand and, at the same time, trip up or sweep the opponent’s ankle or the crook of the knee with the performer's foot or leg.

<Use>

□ Balmok-georeo-neomgigi / 발목 걸어넘기기 / Ankle Tripping-up Technique

□ Ogeum-georeo-neomgigi / 오금 걸어넘기기 / Inner Knee Tripping-up Technique "

Bilde: <Georeo-neomgigi (걸어넘기기) Tripping-up Technique or Sweeping Technique>
   
A technique by tripping up or sweeping the opponent’s leg. This is a tripping-up skill to pull the opponent by the arm or the collar, or to push the opponent’s chest or shoulder with a hand and, at the same time, trip up or sweep the opponent’s ankle or the crook of the knee with the performer's foot or leg.

<Use>

□ Balmok-georeo-neomgigi / 발목 걸어넘기기 / Ankle Tripping-up Technique

□ Ogeum-georeo-neomgigi / 오금 걸어넘기기 / Inner Knee Tripping-up Technique 

<걸어넘기기 Georeoneomgigi>

상대방의 다리를 걸어서 넘어뜨리는 기술입니다. 상대방의 팔이나 멱살을 잡아당기거나 가슴이나 어깨 등을 손으로 밀침과 동시에 발목이나 오금 등을 다리로 걸어 넘어뜨리는 기술입니다.

<활용>
□ 발목 걸어넘기기
□ 오금 걸어넘기기
 Tripping-up Technique or Sweeping Technique

"<Deureo-neomgigi (들어넘기기) Throwing-down Technique>

A throwing down technique by lifting the opponent up. This is a throwing-up skill using the strength of the performer’s waist springing from the bottom up while holding up the opponent’s arm or leg with one's hands or arms.

<Use>
□ Ogeum-deureo-neomgigi / 오금 들어넘기기 / Inner Knee Throwing?down Technique "


Bilde: <Deureo-neomgigi (들어넘기기) Throwing-down Technique>

A throwing down technique by lifting the opponent up.  This is a throwing-up skill using the strength of the performer’s waist springing from the bottom up while holding up the opponent’s arm or leg with one's hands or arms.

<Use>
   □  Ogeum-deureo-neomgigi / 오금 들어넘기기 / Inner Knee Throwing?down Technique 

<들어넘기기 Deureoneomgigi>
상대방을 들어서 넘어뜨리는 기술입니다.  상대방의 오금을 손으로 잡아 올리며 아래에서 위로 솟구치는 허리 힘을 이용하여 들어 넘기는 기술입니다.

 <활용>
    □ 오금 들어넘기기
Throwing-down Technique

◉ TAEKWONDO TECHNIQUE ◉

<Kkeokgi (꺾기) Snapping>

Techniques of restraining by pressing or twisting the opponent’s joints. These are restraining skills to press or twist the opponent’s wrist, elbow, shoulder, ankle, or knee with the performer's hand. These skills are executed when the performer is seized by the assailant or one is grabbing the opponent at close range.
<Biteureo-kkeokgi (비틀어꺾기) Twisting and Snapping>

A snapping technique by twisting the assailant’s joints. This is a snapping skill to twist the opponent’s arm in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction when the performer is grabbed by the wrist or the collar.

<Use>

□ Sonmok-biteureo-kkeokgi / 손목 비틀어꺾기 / Wrist Joint Twist & Snapping

□ Palgup-biteureo-kkeokgi / 팔굽 비틀어꺾기 / Elbow Twist & Snapping "


Bilde: <Biteureo-kkeokgi (비틀어꺾기) Twisting and Snapping>

A snapping technique by twisting the assailant’s joints. This is a snapping skill to twist the opponent’s arm in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction when the performer is grabbed by the wrist or the collar.

<Use>

□ Sonmok-biteureo-kkeokgi / 손목 비틀어꺾기 / Wrist Joint Twist & Snapping

□ Palgup-biteureo-kkeokgi / 팔굽 비틀어꺾기 / Elbow Twist & Snapping 

<비틀어꺾기 Biteureokkeokgi>

상대방의 관절을 비틀어 꺾는 기술입니다. 손목이나 옷깃이 잡혔을 때, 팔을 시계 방향 또는 시계 반대 방향으로 돌리며 상대방의 팔을 꺾어 제압하는 기술입니다. 

<활용>
□ 손목 비틀어꺾기
 Twisting and Snapping
"<Nulleokkeokgi(눌러꺾기) Pressing and Snapping>

A snapping technique by pressing the assailant’s joints. This is a snapping skill to grab the opponent by the arm and press his or her elbow or shoulder joint with an arc hand or to grab the opponent by the leg and press his or her knee joint.

<Use>
□ Mureup-nulleo-kkeokgi / 무릎 눌러꺾기 / Knee Pressing and Snapping

□ Palgup-nulleo-kkeokgi / 팔굽 눌러꺾기 / Elbow Pressing and Snapping "


Bilde: <Nulleokkeokgi(눌러꺾기) Pressing and Snapping>

A snapping technique by pressing the assailant’s joints. This is a snapping skill to grab the opponent by the arm and press his or her elbow or shoulder joint with an arc hand or to grab the opponent by the leg and press his or her knee joint.

<Use>
      □ Mureup-nulleo-kkeokgi / 무릎 눌러꺾기 / Knee Pressing and Snapping

      □ Palgup-nulleo-kkeokgi / 팔굽 눌러꺾기 / Elbow Pressing and Snapping 

<눌러꺾기 Nulleokkeokgi>

상대방의 관절을 눌러 꺾는 기술입니다. 상대방의 팔을 잡았을 때 팔굽이나 어깨 관절 부위를 바탕손 또는 아금손으로 누르거나 다리를 잡았을 때 무릎 관절을 눌러 꺾는 기술입니다. 

    <활용>
    □ 무릎 눌러꺾기
    □ 팔굽 눌러꺾기
Pressing and Snapping

I do not think that the pictures and the text provide enough material to actually make these techniques work, but the mere fact that Kukkiwon is sharing these on their page today in 2014 makes me believe that maybe there is still hope for the Kukkiwon and that Taekwondo as an holistic martial art may live on in the future? Learning the complete art that is Taekwondo is one important step though and I will share this information with anyone saying that Throws, trips and locks are not part of Taekwondo:-) I hope you dear reader will do that too:-)


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11 comments:

  1. Nice post Ørjan! I don't have FB but I believe this stuff is also on the Kukkiwon website. I'm glad they took the time to debunk some myths instead of re-stylizing patterns for tournament grading. :D

    In my last job I worked on a fighting game where a core group of developers practiced BJJ for design work and excercise. I had a conversation regarding TKD and it was frustrating too see a typically intelligent and informed person describe to me how great our art was great at kicking and how great we were at blocking with our fists by our hips (e.g. using Karate kicking practice stance with fists to side in front stance). When I tried to explain how TKD contains grappling in the basic self protection sense, he looked at me as if I swore in a religious building. LOL.



    Examples of grappling in a ***Basic Self Protection Sense*** in TKD literature:

    Tae Kwon Do: The Korean Martial Art - Richard Chun (great overall book, even historical facts are far more realistic).

    Chapter 12: Self defence:

    Pg. 278 - Wrist grabs galore (should read again with a "Bunkai" mentality).
    Pg. 296 - Basic Falling Practice
    Pg. 303 - Basic Throwing Practice
    Pg. 309 - Defenses in Lying Down Positions (contains a "closed guard" and "arm bar" examples).

    Wherever the grappling came from (I like to think of TKD as a blend of many older sourced Martial Arts currently; but it's not MMA, it's not just a sport) it is there and it is valid when you have a competent Master or Instructor show you how to use it to save your life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have actually stopped talking to fellow martial artists about martial arts if I meet someone who says they do (insert martial art here) I just smile and nod. My prior experiences about telling other martial artists about Taekwondo is either that you are ridiculed for doing a womens martial art or childrens martial art or leg fencing. When you try to explain that what you do is not what children do and not what you see on tv Olympics they either want a "demonstration" or they do not really care. As a general rule "All martial artists feel that their chosen martial art is THE best":-)

      It sounds like I need to get Richard Chun`s book:-) All Taekwondo books who even mention break falling and throws must be good;) Oh by the way break falling is Hapkido and Judo -Not Taekwondo. (Kidding:p )

      Delete
    2. I try to ensure that the person I am speaking to is traditionally open minded. I hid the fact I practiced any martial arts for a long time to avoid ridicule and "demonstration" requests. My brother in law is an avid BJJ practitioner so I get a lot of practice avoiding TKD conversation at family dinners. :D

      Richard Chun's book is a veritable tomb of info. I recently read it doesn't contain an Axe Kick which is cool and I need to confirm. The 2nd edition quickly adds the Taegeuk set of patterns. The book is usually stocked at our Indigo/Chapters store chains (don't know your equivalent, but that is where I purchased it) and whilst I don't advocate piracy, a PDF can be procured quite easily if you don't have access to a printed copy to preview.

      Delete
    3. You could do the beer bottle trick if you are drinking beer and they ask for a demonstration. This is what I used to do when I was younger and less inclined to smile and nod:-) You take the man who asks for a demonstrations beer bottle (must be glass and nearly but not completly full). You grasp the bottleneck With Your weak side hand as tightly as you can. Then you use Your open hand and slam on the top of the bottle. When done correctly With sufficient force the bottom of the bottle tears off as if you sawed it off.

      It is not easy but it is not very difficult either and it will shut the mouths of just about anyone:-) It is just physics too. When you slam Your open hand at the top of the bottle the air that is inside is forced downward and it needs to Escape and so the bottom of the bottle falls of cleanly:-)

      I think I need to get Richard Chun`s book on Amazon. Is the 1st and 2nd edition the same except that the Taegeuk forms are included in the 2nd edition?

      Delete
    4. The construction of the 1st edition is supposed to be better in terms of being hardcover with "acid resistant pages". Not sure if the "acid resistant pages" applies to the 2nd edition (which I own) but I can confirm it is not hardcover.

      The 2nd edition adds the Taegeuk set. Both editions apparently omit Kicho 2 and 3.

      The facts on the first edition and 2nd editions can be confirmed within reviews on the Amazon website.

      I've purchased 11 MA books over the last few years and this one is probably the best overall expenditure because of the breadth of content and the timeless representation of TKD as a MA not just a sport. My hope is that you and others enjoy it.

      Delete
  2. Cool, we use these and variations in Jidokwan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My own teacher comes from a Ji Do Kwan lineage too:-) Maybe that is why we both use these kinds of techniques in Our training? Do you guys still practise the "Hyung" (Pyungahn, Chulgi, Palsaek, etc)?

      Delete
  3. well, guess that i should mention that i have both books, and one of his paperback (Ohara pub.) volumes as well. autographed no less, as he was my teacher. the books are good, as mentioned, and for their time, quite comprehensive. i guess things look different when you know everybody who participated in making it.

    my only problem with them is that they are on some level simplistic. everything is block punch. yet i have found very few martial art books that get beyond this level. as noted in my fb post we practiced all of the forms, old and new, and still do to this day at the sister schools (main one closed).

    i once asked him why he kept the old forms (not that i was complaining-i am delighted that he did). he said that all the masters were free to change their curriculum as they saw fit, and that he thought they were valuable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have it on my whish list:-) If I get it I will definitly Write what I think about it on this blog:-) As you note just about all the books on Taekwondo goes greatly into techniques and performance but the Applications of these techniques are almost always confined into the kick Block punch paradigm. I am curious however on Your forms: Would the performance of the forms look like the Moo Duk Kwan forms of the 60s or would they be akin to the Tang Soo Do forms you see today? While the Moo Duk Kwan forms of the 1960s used deep stances etc there seems to be a trend (based on my youtubing) that modern Tang Soo Do takes a deep stance and makes it deeeeeeeper, a long range punch becomes a loooooooooong range punch and every movement becomes a huuuuuuge movement. I would be more interested in seeing the forms as they were in the 1960s than what is often presented as the same forms today (again based on my youtubing)

      Delete
  4. pretty much done the 60s way. most of them would be recognizable to you. i feel that like the sine wave of ITF, the deep stances of the MDK and TSD are modern exaggerations of a teaching method that was supposed to convey a principle, but the lesson got lost in the method. look at some of the comically deep stances that you see in tournament competition these days--totally non functional, but they look good to the judges and crowd.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice! I am happy to know this as well! Now I wonder what the Kukkiwon Textbook has!

    ReplyDelete